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HIS 100 Project 3: Multimedia Presentation Guidelines and Rubric

Overview “If you want to understand today, you have to search yesterday.”

—Pearl Buck Your final longer-term project in this course is to complete a multimedia presentation. The work you did on the Topic Exploration Worksheet in Theme 1 and the historical context and introduction in Theme 3 will directly support your work on this project. One of the prime benefits of studying history is that it allows us to learn about who we are and where we came from. The people and events of the past can often shed light on the conditions and social norms of the present. Having historical awareness can inform various aspects of your life as well as future aspirations. Learning from past failures and successes can shape ideals and values for years to come. This final longer-term project is designed to help you understand the fundamental processes and value of studying history. In the first project, you completed the Topic Exploration Worksheet on one of the topics or themes from the library guide. You investigated the types of research you might need to do to learn more about the topic and developed research questions. In Project 2, you used this worksheet to complete a research plan and introduction. You selected one of your research questions and did some secondary-source research, speculated on primary source needs, and used the information to write the introduction and thesis statement for a possible research paper. In this third project, you will create a multimedia presentation that explores both major developments in historical inquiry and the value of examining history. This assessment addresses the following course outcomes:

 Investigate major developments in the progression of historical inquiry for informing critical questions related to historical narrative

 Articulate the value of examining historical events for their impact on contemporary issues

Prompt Now that you have done some research with primary and secondary sources (using sources from the library guide for your chosen topic) and written an introduction for a possible history paper, you will turn your attention to thinking about the creation and value of historical inquiry. You will use the research you have done throughout this course, as well as course materials, to inform your thoughts. To present your opinions and observations, you will create a multimedia presentation (using a presentation tool such as PowerPoint or Prezi) that addresses the following critical elements. While these questions may seem “big,” remember that you are addressing them in a presentation, not a paper, and can use bullet points, visuals, or other methods. These critical elements will be evaluated from the information you provide in your multimedia presentation. Note: If using Prezi, be sure to include a Word document with notes. If using PowerPoint, be sure to use the speaker notes feature.

Specifically, the following critical elements must be addressed:

I. Articulate how different historical lenses impact how people perceive an historical event. The lenses include political, economic, and social. A. Explain how historical lenses could be applied to your topic. For instance, are there aspects of this event that might interest a political historian

and what are they? B. Choose one of the lenses referenced above, and detail how the historical narrative you started in your research and introduction might change

through this lens. For instance, how might the “story” of your event change when studied through its political aspects? C. Discuss what conclusions you can draw about the “telling” of history in relation to the “teller.” How does this impact for you what “history” is?

Be sure to back up your opinions with information learned throughout the course and in reference to your chosen topic. II. Based on your conclusions, articulate the value of studying history.

A. Describe how you could apply to our lives today what you have learned from the event you have studied. Be sure to reference specific contemporary issues. For instance, what specific issues that we encounter today could benefit from lessons learned from your event?

B. Discuss your opinion of the adage that “history repeats itself.” Do you agree or disagree? Be sure to explain why you have this opinion with information you have learned throughout the course and in your research of your topic.

C. Discuss your obligation as a citizen of your society to understanding the history behind issues that impact you every day. For instance, what civic duties you can be better at if you know more about their history? How can being a more informed member of society benefit you and society?

Supporting Work and Resources For support on developing a multimedia presentation, refer to the PowerPoint Training (Windows PC or Mac) or Prezi Training Atomic Learning tutorials. Log in to Atomic Learning using your SNHU email address as your username and your SNHU email password as your password. Be sure to include notes as needed in your presentation in order to meet the outlined critical elements.

Project 3 Rubric Guidelines for Submission: Your multimedia presentation should be approximately 10 to 12 slides. You are encouraged to include a combination of text, visuals, and sound in order to support your work. Note: If using Prezi, be sure to include a Word document with notes. If using PowerPoint, be sure to include speaker notes.

Critical Elements Exemplary (100%) Proficient (85%) Needs Improvement (55%) Not Evident (0%) Value Historical Lenses:

Your Topic Meets “Proficient” criteria and choice of historical lenses and details demonstrates insight into the topic

Explains how various historical lenses could be applied to the topic

Explains how various historical lenses could be applied to the topic but is overly generalized or has inaccuracies

Does not explain how various historical lenses could be applied to the topic

16

Critical Elements Exemplary (100%) Proficient (85%) Needs Improvement (55%) Not Evident (0%) Value Historical Lenses:

Historical Narrative Meets “Proficient” criteria and details demonstrate highly developed connections between the narrative and the lens

Details how the historical narrative begun in the research and introduction might change through a chosen historical lens

Details how the historical narrative begun in the research and introduction might change through a chosen historical lens but is cursory or has inaccuracies

Does not detail how the historical narrative begun in the research and introduction might change through a chosen historical lens

16

Historical Lenses: Conclusions

Meets “Proficient” criteria and details demonstrate highly developed connections between conclusions and course information

Discusses conclusions drawn about the “telling” of history in relation to the “teller,” backed up by information learned throughout the course

Discusses conclusions drawn about the “telling” of history in relation to the “teller,” but lacks backup by information learned throughout the course, or is cursory or has inaccuracies

Does not discuss conclusions drawn about the “telling” of history in relation to the “teller”

16

Value: Our Lives Meets “Proficient” criteria and connections between past and present demonstrate a nuanced insight into historical application

Describes what can be applied from studying the event to current day, referencing specific contemporary issues

Describes what can be applied from studying the event to current day but lacks reference to specific contemporary issues, or is cursory or has inaccuracies

Does not describe what can be applied from studying the event to current day

16

Value: Opinion Meets “Proficient” criteria and connections between opinion and course information demonstrate a nuanced insight into historical application

Explains opinion of the adage that “history repeats itself” and is backed up by information learned throughout the course

Explains opinion of the adage that “history repeats itself” but lacks backup by information learned throughout the course, or is cursory or has inaccuracies

Does not explain opinion on the adage that “history repeats itself”

16

Value: Obligation Meets “Proficient” criteria and connections between citizen obligations and impactful issues demonstrate a nuanced insight into historical application

Discusses obligation as a citizen of society to understand the history behind impactful issues

Discusses obligation as a citizen of society to understand the history behind impactful issues but is overly generalized

Does not discuss obligation as a citizen of society to understand the history behind impactful issues

16

Articulation of Response

Submission is free of errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, and organization and is presented in a professional and easy-to-read format

Submission has no major errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization

Submission has major errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that negatively impact readability and articulation of main ideas

Submission has critical errors related to citations, grammar, spelling, syntax, or organization that prevent understanding of ideas

4

Total 100%

 

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